Dubuffet, Jean. (1901-1985), "Il y a" - INSCRIBED SCREENPRINT TRIAL PROOF
Dubuffet, Jean. (1901-1985), "Il y a" - INSCRIBED SCREENPRINT TRIAL PROOF
Dubuffet, Jean. (1901-1985), "Il y a" - INSCRIBED SCREENPRINT TRIAL PROOF
Dubuffet, Jean. (1901-1985), "Il y a" - INSCRIBED SCREENPRINT TRIAL PROOF
Dubuffet, Jean. (1901-1985), "Il y a" - INSCRIBED SCREENPRINT TRIAL PROOF
  • Load image into Gallery viewer, Dubuffet, Jean. (1901-1985), "Il y a" - INSCRIBED SCREENPRINT TRIAL PROOF
  • Load image into Gallery viewer, Dubuffet, Jean. (1901-1985), "Il y a" - INSCRIBED SCREENPRINT TRIAL PROOF
  • Load image into Gallery viewer, Dubuffet, Jean. (1901-1985), "Il y a" - INSCRIBED SCREENPRINT TRIAL PROOF
  • Load image into Gallery viewer, Dubuffet, Jean. (1901-1985), "Il y a" - INSCRIBED SCREENPRINT TRIAL PROOF
  • Load image into Gallery viewer, Dubuffet, Jean. (1901-1985), "Il y a" - INSCRIBED SCREENPRINT TRIAL PROOF

Dubuffet, Jean. (1901-1985), "Il y a" - INSCRIBED SCREENPRINT TRIAL PROOF

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"Dubuffet is one of those artists I always check out wherever I can see his works. I remember vividly an exhibit of his I saw as a kid in Strasbourg. I cannot resist the pun of saying he made a lasting impression on me...This print is very special thanks to its personal note." -Blaise

"Il y a by Jacques Berne." Unique screenprint, signed with a personal note and identified "epreuve d'essai"  upper left, 17 November 1978. 13 5/8" x 20".  From the collection of Patrick J. Eddington, a friend of the artist. Archivally framed under UV-plexi. 


The work was conceived and later printed for the book of poetry by Jacques Berne illustrated by Jean Dubuffet. There was an edition of 80 signed and numbered books, as well as another 99 that were not signed or numbered. The present screenprint was prepared in advance of the official publication. 

This is a later work by the French painter, sculptor, and writer whose idealistic approach to aesthetics embraced so called "Art Brut" ("Raw Art" or "Low Art") and eschewed traditional standards of beauty in favor of what he believed to be a more authentic and humanistic approach to image-making.  Purportedly inspired by a doodle he made while on the telephone in 1962, Dubuffet began creating new work in the style he called Hourloupe. He would fill entire pages or canvases with fluid scribble-like lines in densely packed, all-over compositions. Dubuffet explained that these forms evoked the manner in which objects appear in the mind; a crowded jumble of images and emotions. As he continued to experiment, Dubuffet did not limit himself to two-dimensional surfaces, but extended his running lines to three-dimensional sculptures and entire environments. This style would preoccupy Dubuffet for decades.